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What is Palliative Care?

Palliative (pal-ee-uh-tiv) care refers to a form of medical treatment that aims to reduce pain and the severity of disease symptoms. Palliative care treatment does not focus efforts on delaying or interrupting the progression of the disease. In other words, the goal of palliative care is to make a life of chronic pain and illness more manageable – not to cure the disease.

Palliative care is an excellent option  for those looking to improve their quality of life with specialized care. Individuals who benefit from palliative care are burdened by chronic illnesses such as ALS, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, AIDS, and more.

This treatment approach was originally developed exclusively for individuals with a terminal illness, but as need within a greater niche became apparent, palliative care expanded to include anyone with chronic and severe disease symptoms – terminal or otherwise. It has grown to include treatment for a wide range of symptoms including but not limited to pain, bowel or bladder problems, nausea and vomiting, weakness, mobility problems, and delirium or mental confusion.

If you are struggling to manage your day-to-day symptoms, or you have a loved one who needs assistance with pain management, consider a palliative care treatment approach. Interested in learning more about whether or not palliative care is the right choice for you?